Electron Microscopy

ICBR-ElectronMicroscopy@ad.ufl.edu   ///  (352) 392-1184   ///  RRID: SCR_019146
TEM & SEM (Room Temperature & Cryo), Confocal Microscopy, Sample Preparation & More

CORE OVERVIEW

ICBR Electron Microscopy supports researchers in visualizing microscopic structures through imaging projects and user training. We strive to aid scientists in solving problems and to help push their research forward by providing the tools needed for successful publication and grant applications. Major service categories include: room temperature and cryo transmission and scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, sample preparation and user training.

We're hiring a Core Research Facility Technician III to support the Scientific Research Manager in the Electron Microscopy Core laboratory at UF | ICBR!

To apply, please visit: https://explore.jobs.ufl.edu/en-us/job/519573/core-research-facility-technician-iii

CORE NEWS

ICBR Closed Monday for the 4th of July ICBR Closed Monday for the 4th of July
ICBR Closed Monday for the 4th of July
ICBR Closed Monday for the 4th of July ICBR will be closed this Monday (7/4) in observation of the 4th of July   We will not be accepting packages or samples on Monday. Our normal business hours will resume on Tuesday (7/5). Enjoy the the long weekend and celebrate responsibly!   Please refer to our staff directory for additional details. ...
Read More
ICBR Closed Monday for the 4th of July
Plants can grow in Moon dirt — here’s why knowing that is so important Plants can grow in Moon dirt — here’s why knowing that is so important
Plants can grow in Moon dirt — here’s why knowing that is so important
Plants can grow in Moon dirt — here’s why knowing that is so important The Hill Anna-Lisa Paul and Robert Ferl Humans are once again headed to the Moon. This return to the Moon means we will, for the first time, witness humans not only visiting, but living and working on the Moon. We will witness our civilization literally moving off the surface of the Earth. The lunar landings of 1969 through 1972 were short stays. The demands of getting to and returning from the Moon with the technology of tha...
Read More
Plants can grow in Moon dirt — here’s why knowing that is so important
ICBR attends AGBT 2022 General Meeting! ICBR attends AGBT 2022 General Meeting!
ICBR attends AGBT 2022 General Meeting!
This June, ICBR attended the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) General Meeting in Orlando, the preeminent genome science and technology conference for top global researchers, leaders and innovators. AGBT delivers a premier experience where heads of labs, institutions, businesses, financial analysts and other high-level stakeholders come together to advance the field and drive game-changing innovation. Significant scientific advances are announced and showcased, science and industr...
Read More
ICBR attends AGBT 2022 General Meeting!
Important Dates for Fiscal Year End Important Dates for Fiscal Year End
Important Dates for Fiscal Year End
Please note: Due to the Fiscal Year End, the last invoices to process for FY2022 will be created on Monday, June 13th.  Due to Fiscal Year End, ICBR’s upcoming billing schedule will be altered as follows: 6/13/2022 – Last invoices generated in fiscal year 2022 6/23/2022 at noon – Deadline to submit disputes for FY2022 payment. 7/5/2022 – Invoices will begin to be created for FY2023 If you have expiring funds, please work with your core laboratory contact to make sure your project is completed ...
Read More
Important Dates for Fiscal Year End
A first: Scientists grow plants in soil from the Moon A first: Scientists grow plants in soil from the Moon
A first: Scientists grow plants in soil from the Moon
A first: Scientists grow plants in soil from the Moon from UF/IFAS by Samantha Murray Scientists have grown plants in soil from the Moon, a first in human history and a milestone in lunar and space exploration. In a new paper published in the journal “Communications Biology,” University of Florida researchers showed that plants can successfully sprout and grow in lunar soil. Their study also investigated how plants respond biologically to the Moon’s soil, also known as lunar regolith, which is r...
Read More
A first: Scientists grow plants in soil from the Moon
SynGatorTron™ to speed medical research, alleviate privacy worries SynGatorTron™ to speed medical research, alleviate privacy worries
SynGatorTron™ to speed medical research, alleviate privacy worries
from UF Health “Dr. Chatbot will see you now.” The next generation of super-smart computers, tablets and cell phones may come equipped with artificial intelligence-generated medical chatbots that can interact with patients using human language and medical knowledge. According to Yonghui Wu, Ph.D., director of natural language processing at the University of Florida Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the medical chatbot you interact with online will be able to use conversational langua...
Read More
SynGatorTron™ to speed medical research, alleviate privacy worries
UF Small Animal Hospital to offer free eye, heart screenings for service animals UF Small Animal Hospital to offer free eye, heart screenings for service animals
UF Small Animal Hospital to offer free eye, heart screenings for service animals
UF Small Animal Hospital to offer free eye, heart screenings for service animals from UF Health The University of Florida’s Small Animal Hospital will offer free eye and heart screenings for service animals on May 20 as part of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists-StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event. Service animals typically include guide dogs, disability assistance dogs, detection dogs, police dogs, search and rescue dogs, and formally trained and certified therapy d...
Read More
UF Small Animal Hospital to offer free eye, heart screenings for service animals
Rhes protein key in spread of Huntington’s disease in the brain Rhes protein key in spread of Huntington’s disease in the brain
Rhes protein key in spread of Huntington’s disease in the brain
Rhes protein key in spread of Huntington’s disease in the brain from UF Health By: Bill Levesque Pathogenic proteins help spread many neurodegenerative diseases. How they move between brain cells is often shrouded in mystery. But scientists at Scripps Research’s Florida campus have found that nanotube tunnels that act like roadways capable of transporting cargo between cells can transmit a toxic protein linked to Huntington’s disease from neuron to neuron in the live brains of mouse models. The ...
Read More
Rhes protein key in spread of Huntington’s disease in the brain

CORE INSTRUMENTS

Electron Microscopy